Picrowave – incredibly cool Raspberry Pi project

raspberry-pi-microwaveWhy bother owning a traditional microwave when you can swap out some innards and create your very own Pi-powered food nuker?

Developer Nathan Broadbent took his microwave apart, redesigned the touchpad, and added some new functions like voice control, a barcode scanner to access an online database of cooking times, a web-based interface for remote access, and auto-tweets for when the timer is done.

USB Killer – flash drive designed to fry your laptop

usb-killerThe basic idea of the USB Killer drive is quite simple. When we connect it up to the USB port, an inverting DC/DC converter runs and charges capacitors to -110V. When the voltage is reached, the DC/DC is switched off. At the same time, the filed transistor opens. It is used to apply the -110V to signal lines of the USB interface. When the voltage on capacitors increases to -7V, the transistor closes and the DC/DC starts. The loop runs till everything possible is broken down. Those familiar with the electronics have already guessed why we use negative voltage here. I‘ll explain to others that negative voltage is easier to commutate, as we need the N-channel field resistor, which, unlike the P-channel one, can have larger current for the same dimensions.

Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center

openelec_logo

Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center (OpenELEC) is a small Linux distribution built from scratch as a platform to turn your computer into a Kodi (previously XBMC) media center. OpenELEC is designed to make your system boot fast, and the install is so easy that anyone can turn a blank PC into a media machine in less than 15 minutes.

  • It’s completely free!
  • A full install is only 90-125MB using only minimal hardware requirements
  • Simple installers & diskimages for HDD, SSD, Compact Flash, SD card, USB etc.
  • Now one generic build for Nvidia, AMD, Intel based on x64/x86-64 hardware
  • Separate builds for Raspberry Pi 1 and 2, and Apple TV (upto v4.2.1, now deprecated)
  • Freescale iMX6 ARM builds for Cubox-i, CuboxTV and Hummingboard boxes
  • Simple configuration through the Kodi & OpenELEC interfaces
  • Plug and Play external storage
  • File sharing via the SAMBA file protocol out-of-the-box

How to install PhoneGap

rifix-blog-phonegap

To Install, ensure that you have NodeJS installed, then open your command-line and run the following:

C:\> npm install -g phonegap

Once installation completes, you can invoke phonegap on command line for further help.

 


 

Usage

$ phonegap create my-app
$ cd my-app
$ phonegap run android

Learn more at docs.phonegap.com

Android Studio 1.0.1 System Requirements

android-studio-2

Windows

  • Microsoft® Windows® 8/7/Vista/2003 (32 or 64-bit)
  • 2 GB RAM minimum, 4 GB RAM recommended
  • 400 MB hard disk space + at least 1 G for Android SDK, emulator system images, and caches
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution
  • Java Development Kit (JDK) 7
  • Optional for accelerated emulator: Intel® processor with support for Intel® VT-x, Intel® EM64T (Intel® 64), and Execute Disable (XD) Bit functionality

Mac OS X

  • Mac® OS X® 10.8.5 or higher, up to 10.9 (Mavericks)
  • 2 GB RAM minimum, 4 GB RAM recommended
  • 400 MB hard disk space
  • At least 1 GB for Android SDK, emulator system images, and caches
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution
  • Java Runtime Environment (JRE) 6
  • Java Development Kit (JDK) 7
  • Optional for accelerated emulator: Intel® processor with support for Intel® VT-x, Intel® EM64T (Intel® 64), and Execute Disable (XD) Bit functionality

On Mac OS, run Android Studio with Java Runtime Environment (JRE) 6 for optimized font rendering. You can then configure your project to use Java Development Kit (JDK) 6 or JDK 7.

Linux

  • GNOME or KDE desktop
  • GNU C Library (glibc) 2.11 or later
  • 2 GB RAM minimum, 4 GB RAM recommended
  • 400 MB hard disk space
  • At least 1 GB for Android SDK, emulator system images, and caches
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution
  • Oracle® Java Development Kit (JDK) 7

Tested on Ubuntu® 12.04, Precise Pangolin (64-bit distribution capable of running 32-bit applications.

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