Vue Modals, Spinners, and Tailwind

In this episode, come along as I prepare a login modal from scratch. As it turns out, this will provide a number of useful real world examples for us to work through. How do you display and hide a modal from anywhere in your app? Can we display validation errors without manually performing a full page refresh? What can we use to rapidly style our form? And might we implement one of those fancy loading spinners after the "Log In" button is pressed? All of these questions (and more) will be answered.
Source: Laracasts

How to Test Validation Rules

A frequent testing question that pops up relates to how you go about testing validation rules. Or, in other words, if we need to ensure that, say, a valid email address is required when a contact form is submitted by the user, how exactly do we do that? I’ll show you how in this episode, using a real world example.
Source: Laracasts

Private Channels

Now that we understand what the problem is, we can implement a solution. In this episode, we’ll switch to using a private channel. As part of this process, we can also specify any number of broadcasting authorization rules within routes/channels.php.
Source: Laracasts

Public Channels and Sensitive Data Don’t Mix

As a basic rule, if the event you’re broadcasting is sensitive in nature (order details, direct messaging, etc.), then you should reach for a PrivateChannel. This way, you can assign special authorization rules for the message. Let’s review why this is so important.
Source: Laracasts

Cache-Busting Assets

The `mix.version()` call will append a unique hash to each file within your generated `mix-manifest.json` file. This can be used to instruct your server when to "bust the cache," and fetch a new copy of the related asset.
Source: Laracasts

Automatic Browser Refreshing

Mix provides out-of-the-box support for Browsersync, which allows us to detect and refresh the browser each time a relevant asset of yours has changed. No longer will you have to manually refresh the browser over and over to review small, visual tweaks.
Source: Laracasts

Adding PostCSS Plugins

PostCSS may be used standalone, or even as a secondary step after your core Sass/Less compilation. Either way, the end result will be the same. Think of PostCSS plugins as layers of an onion, so to speak. Each layer has the chance to operate upon your stylesheet, and modify it in some way. Once complete, those styles are then passed on to the next layer of the onion. Let’s review this workflow, when using Laravel Mix.
Source: Laracasts

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